06 November 2016

2017 plans

This blog has been a pleasure to write, but in 2017 I expect to be busy with new projects in writing and publishing. I will knit as I have time, but I don't think I'll be updating this blog. I'll miss sharing my thoughts and projects with you, my readers!


Here are two of my animal friends, who will be getting new Christmas outfits.





Best wishes for the year!


05 November 2016

Christmas already?

Though we just got past Halloween, it's not a bit too early to begin with Christmas knittting.

The Yarn Harlot (Stephanie Pearl-McPhee) is already making Christmas ornaments.



I am busy with American Girl clothes for my granddaughter. She recently got a Bittie Baby, so I need to look for some patterns.


And this Christmas, Charlie Brown will get a Christmas sweater (he wants one that fits him)


And I need to think about what to do with this piece of knitting that I made last Christmas


Yes, it's time for Christmas~

30 October 2016

Mountain Meadow Wool: a mill I want to get to know!


The Mission

To revitalize the American wool industry, preserve the West, and create American made high-quality products through eco-friendly operations and fair prices for Ranchers."



Our Beginning

Mountain Meadow is a spinning mill set below the Big Horn Mountains on the Western Plains of Wyoming.  It is a family operated mill, owned by Karen Hostetler, and dedicated to supporting local ranchers and raising awareness about ranching culture in the American West.  Mountain Meadow is committed to revitalizing the American wool industry through eco-friendly operations and fair prices for ranchers. 



02 October 2016

22 September 2016

When the Frost is on the Punkin BY JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/knitted-pumpkin-pattern

When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock, 
And you hear the kyouck and gobble of the struttin’ turkey-cock, 
And the clackin’ of the guineys, and the cluckin’ of the hens, 
And the rooster’s hallylooyer as he tiptoes on the fence; 
O, it’s then’s the times a feller is a-feelin’ at his best, 
With the risin’ sun to greet him from a night of peaceful rest, 
As he leaves the house, bareheaded, and goes out to feed the stock, 
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock. 

They’s something kindo’ harty-like about the atmusfere 
When the heat of summer’s over and the coolin’ fall is here— 
Of course we miss the flowers, and the blossums on the trees, 
And the mumble of the hummin’-birds and buzzin’ of the bees; 
But the air’s so appetizin’; and the landscape through the haze 
Of a crisp and sunny morning of the airly autumn days 
Is a pictur’ that no painter has the colorin’ to mock— 
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock. 

The husky, rusty russel of the tossels of the corn, 
And the raspin’ of the tangled leaves, as golden as the morn; 
The stubble in the furries—kindo’ lonesome-like, but still 
A-preachin’ sermuns to us of the barns they growed to fill; 
The strawstack in the medder, and the reaper in the shed; 
The hosses in theyr stalls below—the clover over-head!— 
O, it sets my hart a-clickin’ like the tickin’ of a clock, 
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock! 

Then your apples all is gethered, and the ones a feller keeps 
Is poured around the celler-floor in red and yeller heaps; 
And your cider-makin’ ’s over, and your wimmern-folks is through 
With their mince and apple-butter, and theyr souse and saussage, too! ... 
I don’t know how to tell it—but ef sich a thing could be 
As the Angels wantin’ boardin’, and they’d call around on me— 
I’d want to ’commodate ’em—all the whole-indurin’ flock— 
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock!

www.poetryfoundation.org

05 September 2016

"I know this scarf"

One of my favorite scarf patterns is the Chinook Scarf by Ali Green. I've made it in different yarns, on different needles, and have modified it more often than not to be longer than the original pattern. Here's a link to the pattern:

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/chinook-scarf

My most recent Chinook Scarf was a gift for Marie, who's also a knitter. The yarn I used, and liked very much, is Flertini from Knit One, Crochet Too:

"Fleurtini is a soft yarn with a slight texture. It knits up quickly and is suitable for year-round wear. Hand wash cold and lay flat to dry.
34% Wool
34% Manufactured Fibers - Acrylic
26% Cotton
6% Manufactured Fibers - Nylon / Polyamide"


When she pulled the scarf out of the recycled-plastic Blue Q purse I gave her, she said, "I know this scarf!"

Hot Rocks Messenger Bag

She draped it around her neck as she handed her baby the pull-apart animals I brought him from the US. I was pleased at how long the scarf is! All on a pleasant day in Prague.


28 August 2016

Writing and knitting


It may seem that writing and knitting do not have much in common, but let me enumerate their amazing similarities:

  • 1.       You start with a pile of materials and make something that only you can make.
  • 2.      You contemplate the pile for a while before you begin, letting your imagination run wild.
  • 3.       Sometimes you don’t like what you’ve done and rip it out
  • 4.      Sometimes the finished item bears little resemblance to your imagined thing of beauty.
  • 5.       The mistakes you make will never go away. Corollary: you will see new mistakes or ways to improve every time you look at the finished item.
  • 6.      People are amazed and in awe at what you have done, while you feel slightly embarrassed at the many flaws and faults that leap out at you. Advice: don’t point out the flaws; this will only make your admirers think that they are unobservant and is often taken as fishing for a compliment and will only get you more praise (“oh, no, it’s perfect!”), not the commiseration you subconsciously seek (“I could have done so much better!”)


Yes, writing and knitting are very much alike. Both require skill, patience and creativity. And both communicate your innermost self, which is always a bit of a risk.



31 July 2016

on my way to Prague!

I love Prague, where I have lived, worked and made wonderful friends over the past 26 years. Now I live in Florida, but next week I'll fly to Prague via Copenhagen and visit my friends there!

Naturally I'll take some warm knitted goods, made with my brain and my own two hands, with me, to give to people who will need them soon! Here are a few of the gifts I will take with me:


14 June 2016

Second Fig BY EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY


Safe upon the solid rock the ugly houses stand: 
Come and see my shining palace built upon the sand! 

www.poetryfoundation.org